The Residents of this Town Eat Zombies for Lunch

Welcome to Auraria, a place the dead have never left. The setting of my latest book, Beneath the Veil, is a ghost town forgotten by time and most everyone else. To those lucky enough to drive by and keep going, this town is just a whisper from the past with crumbling buildings and overgrown fields dotted with rusting farm implements.  

Like any place, this town has many sides and only the truly unfortunate get to see them all. These people, the ones that stumble too close, quickly realize it’s impossible to leave. So, what do you do if you find yourself trapped in this unforgiving place? You try to make friends. Here’s a helpful listing of the town’s most prominent citizens:

Barry (Rhodes) Ryan is a successful sculptor suffering from a terminal illness. Adopted when he was an infant, he is forced to seek out a blood relative for a transfusion to save his life. Frequently creates art work weighing several tons…

Jen Ryan, Barry’s adopted younger sister, is brave, independent and free spirited. She works as a free lance photographer and lives in downtown Atlanta with her boyfriend Jackson. Prefers shooting in black and white…

Jackson is Jen’s boyfriend. He’s an easy-going dude who runs a small record shop. When he’s not slinging vinyl, he likes hanging with Jen and her brother. Drives a ‘70s van…

Willow is a young, local girl with a charitable heart who possesses a set of very unique talents. Loves children…

James Downs survived a plane crash that stranded him in Auraria.  Retired military…

Don “Doc” Randolph is the de facto mayor of Auraria. Doc provides free medical care to his neighbors…

Evangeline Rhodes hails from an uncertain past and preys on the locals. She’s not really a brunette…

Ezra Rhodes is Evangeline’s constant companion and takes care of many of her more unpleasant tasks. Once owned a bank in town…

Owen Bigsby loves to sample the corn liquor grown locally and is Auraria’s own town drunk. Lets others control him…

Well, there you have it, a sampling of the Auraria locals and don’t worry, there’s plenty more of them to meet and many to be avoided.

Posted on August 27, 2013 .

Welcome to Social City

I walk from a subway station deep below ground level and then climb a series of stairs until I reach a city street. I have something important to say to the multitudes of people rushing past on a busy avenue. I spot an imposing building on the corner of Here and Now and then rush up its marble steps. When I reach the top, I begin shouting at the harried commuters below.

All around me, others are shouting as well. Some shout from open windows, while others stand along the street hoping to be noticed. Occasionally, someone stops to listen while an unending stream of people continues past.

As a writer I get to spend time in a literary underground creating characters and devising plot lines. But, when these elements take shape and a book is born, it’s time to take the long climb up into the sunlight to start shouting. Now, websites, blogging, Twitter, and Facebook, all become part of the story.

Welcome to Social City, where websites are the billboards, reliable and content rich, but slow and difficult to change. Facebook is the bus advertising, moving past with messages and images scrolling by block after block. Twitter is the constant chatter of the moving crowd with short comments coming from every direction. Blogs are the local coffee houses buzzing with conversation.

I believe the key to social media is not spending too much time posting, tweeting or coding, instead of creating the next page of the next book, which is the real job. Making your message rise above the rest and getting noticed is also challenging. Good content is imperative, but sadly it’s the outrageous that sometimes gets the most attention. The art is in balancing the two. I recently received good attention from a tweet about my latest book, Beneath the Veil. The tweet read - The residents of this town eat zombies for lunch. It’s not literally true…as far as I know, but it is outrageous enough to draw attention and tied in well with elements of my book.